Monday, August 15, 2005

The Airline Interview


Think you can pass the career determining airline interview? Over the next few months we’ll be publishing a series of technical questions that interviewers are asking. With any luck you should be able to answer them all!

The Airline InterviewSee if you can answer or explain the concepts before looking at the answers. Even if you don’t know the right answer how you handle the situation can play a big factor in the ultimate decision. Good luck!

Questions – Flight Technical

1. In an AC electrical system what device converts AC to DC?

2. On takeoff, the left engine fails at 143 KIAS. The V1 speed is 142 KIAS. What would you do?

3. What function(s) do leading-edge slats perform?

4. What is Dutch roll?

5. What does 1013.2 millibars equate to in inches of mercury?

6. Does altitude effect stall speed?

7. What is the advantage of a swept wing aircraft?

8. When landing, while in full reverse, your aircraft begins to drift left. What would you do?

9. What are WAT (weight, altitude and temperature) limits?

10. What is a SID?

11. Why does a tailwind increase takeoff roll length?

12. What would cause an airplane to hydroplane the most?

13. What effect does altitude have on mach number?

14. What is the one in sixty rule?

15. Two aircraft are flying at different flight levels at the same Mach number, which aircraft would have the higher TAS (True Airspeed).

Answers – Flight Technical

1. In an AC electrical system what device converts AC to DC? Answer: (TRU) Transformer Rectifier Unit

2. On takeoff, the left engine fails at 143 KIAS. The V1 speed is 142 KIAS. What would you do? Answer: Continue the takeoff, rotate at Vr and climb at the V2 speed

3. What function(s) do leading-edge slats do? Answer: They increase the wings chamber area and MAC (mean aerodynamic cord) thereby increasing the lift coefficient which in return reduces the aircraft’s stall speed.

4. What is Dutch roll? Answer: Technically described as an oscillatory instability associated with swept-wing aircraft. It's a manoeuvre that combines yawing and rolling motion, sort of like a falling leaf. Dutch roll occurs when a yaw is introduced which causes the outer wing to travel faster resulting in greater lift on that particular wing. Consequently, the inner wing will travel slower resulting in less lift on that particular wing. A noticeable bank occurs as the upward moving wing stalls causing the wing to drop. The wing drops causing a yaw to the stalled wing and thus leading to the sequence being repeated in the opposite direction. The oscillations will become greater in magnitude.

5. What does 1013.2 millibars equate to in inches of mercury? Answer: 29.92 inches of mercury.

6. Does altitude effect stall speed? Answer: Yes.

7. What is the advantage of a swept wing aircraft? Answer: Higher critical Mach number.

8. When landing, while in full reverse, your aircraft begins to drift left. What would you do? Answer: Take both engines out of reverse or reduce power on the left engine.

9. What are WAT (weight, altitude and temperature) limits? Answer: An aircrafts MTOW (maximum take-off weight) is limited so that it will meet the required second segment climb gradient performance with one engine inoperative taking into account pressure altitude and temperature.

10. What is a SID? Answer: Standard Instrument Departure (SID) is a procedure assigned to departing aircraft by ATC.

11. Why does a tailwind increase takeoff roll length? Answer: A tailwind component requires the aircraft to achieve a greater groundspeed in order to attain the proper take-off speed.

12. What would cause an airplane to hydroplane the most? Answer: Under-inflated tires. The minimum speed at which dynamic hydroplaning begins is directly related to tire pressure.

13. What effect does altitude have on Mach number? Answer: Due to the fact that the speed of sound decreases in colder air the Mach number goes up as altitude increases.

14. What is the one in sixty rule? Answer: At 60DME each radial equals 1 mile.

15. Two aircraft are flying at different flight levels at the same Mach number. Which aircraft would have the higher TAS (True Airspeed)? Answer: The aircraft at the lower altitude has a higher true airspeed. The speed of sound decreases as temperature decreases with an increase in altitude.

More interview questions at: http://www.NorthAmericanFlyer.com

1 Comments:

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